Great Western Railway jigsaw collection - page 1


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Caerphilly Castle - version 3

About 150 pieces (approx. 23 1⁄4"x8 1⁄2") in brown box with cream label, but with one piece missing and one broken.
Published from 1924 to 1928.
Featuring the engine 'Caerphilly Castle' number 4073, derived from a photograph.

This third version has a more fluid interlocking cut and a much simplified outline at the front of the locomotive and to the rear of the tender. Interestingly, the smokebox lamp bracket is included in this example, but this may simply be down to the personal whim of the cutter. The puzzle is contained in, what from now on will be, the standard brown box and is an example the third (and last) version of this puzzle. Included in the box is an original (but undated) postcard with a picture of the locomotive with technical details on the front, and advertising for the first three ‘volumes for Boys of all ages’ over-printed on the reverse.



The 'St.Julien'

About 150 pieces (approx. 27 3⁄4"x10 3⁄4") in brown box with cream label, but with three pieces and a nib missing.
Published from 1926 to 1928. It is cut to the outline of the ship and masts, with a wavy bottom edge.
This unsigned image was possibly derived from a photograph.

The ship was built by John Brown & Co. on the Clyde in 1925 and was used as a pasenger ferry between Weymouth and the Channel Islands. She had two funnels, one of which was a dummy and this was removed in 1928. When war broke out in 1939 she was first put to use ferrying troops but was soon converted into a hospital ship. She took part in the evacuation of British troops from Dunkirk and Cherbourg in 1940, spent a period operating in the Mediterranean, and supported the D Day landings. Returned to the GWR in 1946 she passed to British Railways on 1st January 1948 and was eventually scrapped in 1961.



A Railway Station

About 150 pieces, twin puzzles each of 75 pieces (each approx. 12 3⁄4"x5 3⁄4") in divided brown box with cream label.
Published from 1926 to 1929.

At first glance the label suggests that the box contains a single puzzle of about 150 pieces titled The Railway Station and it carries a single monochrome guide picture. However, above the guide picture is printed Two Pictures, Each 13"x6", this being the only indication that the box actually contains two small puzzles, each in its own compartment.

The first puzzle, which features in the guide picture, illustrates Paddington Station in 1862 and is based on a picture by the artist W.P.Frith. This was the subject of a larger puzzle published in 1930 and is described in detail on a later page.
The second puzzle is of the same station but in 'modern' times (1926) and bears the name of the artist Tony Royle. In the foreground it is believed to show the Cornish Riviera Express standing at Platform One.



Freight Train

About 150 pieces (approx. 22"x8 1⁄4") in brown box with cream label, but with three pieces missing and two broken.
Published from 1927 to 1930.
This puzzle is the more common straight edged version. From a painting by the artist F.N.J.Moody.

The 2-8-0 engine number 2861 is shown hauling a freight train of over thirty wagons of different types. The train is passing a signal box, whilst in the far distance the end of the train can be seen still emerging from under a red bridge. The location is unknown and might be fictitious.



Freight Train

About 150 pieces (approx. 21 3⁄4"x8 1⁄4") in brown box with cream label, but with one piece missing and one damaged.
Published from 1927 to 1930. This version of the puzzle has wavy edges as opposed to the more common straight ones. Comparison with the straight edged version serves to highlight the individual cutting techniques.
From a painting by the artist F.N.J.Moody.



Oxford

About 150 pieces (approx. 16"x12") in brown box with cream label.
Published from 1927 to 1930 this puzzle is the only one published which was not in full colour and only sold a few thousand copies.
Sepia pen and ink illustration of Oxford High Street by the artist Fred Taylor.



St.Julien

About 150 pieces (approx. 17"x11") in brown box with cream label listing other puzzles available, but with retailer's label applied on one side.
Published from 1927 to 1931. The outline of the ship is cut within the main puzzle.
By an unknown artist.

The GWR must have been proud of their new ship as this is the second puzzle to be produced featuring the St.Julien. Refer to the description of the first puzzle above for more background to the ship.



The Cornish Riviera Express

About 150 pieces (approx. 21"x9") in brown box with cream label listing other puzzles available.
Published from 1927 to 1936, this is the early version and has wavy edges. The puzzle was renamed and increased to about 200 pieces from 1934.
Featuring the engine 'Abbotsbury Castle' on its way to Penzance near Dawlish, it is by the artist James Thorpe.



Speed

About 150 pieces (approx. 20"x11") in brown box with cream label listing other puzzles available.
Published from 1928 to 1930. It is cut to the outline of the train and exhaust, with a wavy bottom edge.
Featuring the engine 'Caerphilly Castle' number 4073 by an unknown artist.



Swansea Docks

About 150 pieces (approx. 17"x11") in brown box with cream label.
Published from 1928 to 1932. This puzzle has wavy sides and top, but a straight bottom edge. Within the puzzle it is cut to the outline of the quays, ships and clouds.
The city of Swansea can be seen in the distance with Swansea bay curving west towards Mumbles Head and lighthouse.
Signed by the artist Charles Fayson and dated 1927.




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